Energy Transfer Ruffed Grouse award

Representatives from Energy Transfer received a Northeast Environmental Partnership Award for their collaborative work to create more than 100 acres of wildlife habitat in Bradford County, Pa. The award was given on Oct. 24 at Woodlands Inn and Resort in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. -- Representatives from Energy Transfer received a Northeast Environmental Partnership Award for their collaborative work to create more than 100 acres of wildlife habitat in Bradford County, Pa.

Titled the Roughneck Aspen Management Project, the award-winning venture was a collaborative effort by Energy Transfer, Chief Oil & Gas, Williams Co., the Ruffed Grouse Society and the Pennsylvania Game Commission. While Game Commission personnel provided the necessary technical support for the project, partnering companies deployed contractors to carry out the work and provided funds to harvest timber.

“Energy Transfer is committed to environmental conservation surrounding all of the work we do, from pipeline planning and design to restoration and operation,” said Doug Speerstra, engineer and project manager for Energy Transfer. “In Northeast Pennsylvania, we are deep-rooted in a community of hunters, anglers and outdoor enthusiasts who live, work and play on these lands. We are honored to have made this project a reality and benefit regional wildlife for years to come.” 

Through a financial contribution, Energy Transfer was able to help create 107 acres of early successional habitat on State Game Lands 12 and 36, in Northeast Pennsylvania, to attract ruffed grouse – Pennsylvania’s state bird – as well as American woodcock, golden-winged warbler, deer, bear and turkey. Early successional habitat is described as a young forest in its first 20 years of growth, or a grassland, weedy area or shrub thicket. This type of habitat suits specific wildlife requiring young forests to flourish and needs disturbance – such as mowing, burning or cutting – to be maintained.

“These energy development companies have interests on state game lands and are committed to giving something back to wildlife and sportsmen,” Game Commission Land Management Group Supervisor Phil Kasper said. “The Roughneck Aspen Management Project is a prime example of how a wildlife agency, partnering with conservation organizations and industry, can make large-scale impacts on wildlife habitat within the commonwealth.”

The award was given an annual awards dinner on Oct. 24 at the Woodlands Inn and Resort in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. For more information on the project, visit https://cms.energytransfer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/ET-Biological-Preservation-v5.pdf.